Should Parents Study Martial Arts With Their Kids?


As a parent, husband and instructor I am always surprised more moms and dads are not in class. I understand time and money can be obstacles but outside of these very common hurdles one should consider trying out and even joining a martial arts class.

Isshin-ryu karate is advantageous to a parent or spouse because the techniques are used for real world confrontations. For example, the movements are not fancy and contrary to belief, the karate ka does not kick a lot ,we like to keep our feet on the ground to shift our bodies. When we do kick it is done low, fast, and with a purpose. Karate techniques are not meant to be used for fighting but rather to end the confrontation only when one's life is in imminent danger or death.

A mind set that all parents and spouses should adhere to--We want to be able to go back to our families!

Training regularly in a dojo has many benefits and one of these benefits is becoming familiar with something that most people try to avoid their whole life, and that is physical confrontation. As much as we try to flee or defuse the situation, unfortunately the choice is not always ours to avoid.

And as we grow older and as our families grow bigger and crime increases, the need for practical self-defense may become a necessity for personal protection. Karate addresses both standing and ground fighting because physical confrontations can come in many forms and have many factors, but the outcome must be the same which is to be able to go back to our families. In an era of guns and conceal carry it is easy and comforting for one to rely on the ultimate end but the gun has its technical and legal limitations . Karate can both enhance gun techniques and is an invaluable alternative when one cannot carry.

It is true that karate takes time to be able to utilize it to its full potential yet even on the first day of class one can feel empowered.


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© 2019 Jon Oshita